Breaking the boundary

Linda Strachan ‘brought’ her arsonist and Sophie McKenzie a terrorist, and that’s just their most recent YA books. But I think that just goes to prove that younger readers don’t want fluffy bunnies more than the rest of us do.

Bloody Scotland

They were talking with Claire Squires from the University of Stirling, and one thing she wanted to know was if they consider themselves crime writers. I think in a way they don’t, even though they write about crimes, and Linda at least always has a policeman in there, somewhere.

I was glad Linda got an opportunity to explain her recent arsonist novel, Don’t Judge Me. I’d been worried it could be read as a recipe for ‘how to’ but she had actually checked with the fire brigade when she wrote it and they felt it was fine. (It’s probably like sex. Just because you put it in a book, doesn’t mean everyone will immediately go out and copy the behaviour of characters in a book.)

Split Second, which is Sophie’s brand new book, is about a terrorist, and begins with a bomb going off in a crowded place. A bomb planted by the brother of the main character. So that sounds more than exciting.

Her reasoning is to show consequences (the importance of showing, not telling), because we have all been at the stage where we think ‘oh, why did I do that?’

Both ladies read from their books, and I think anyone who hadn’t already, would want to grab a copy for themselves.

Linda Strachan and Sophie McKenzie

There are no taboo subjects. It’s what you do with them. Adults should remember their own teen years, and both Linda and Sophie do. They feel that the gatekeepers of young fiction believe – erroneously – that ‘if we tell teenagers that sex exists, they’ll want to go off and have it.’

Sophie goes no further than kisses, and does not want to put off boy readers by doing relationships in too much depth. They want them, but not too much. As for swearing, sticking to what you are allowed to say in front of your teacher seems a useful guideline.

While we are at school, both authors had only praise for school librarians, who do more than stamp dates in books or ban certain books from their libraries. They are the ones who know what book to offer each reader, and that’s how children and teens learn about what they might like. Librarians are to be appreciated.

Asked whether they’d be happy to hide their sex on book covers by going for initials, both seemed to think not. Linda has knives and stuff on her covers, which is cool enough. Sophie would rather not think she has ended up back in the 18th century, and won’t hide her ‘fluffy, feminine’ name for any reason.

This was a great start for Bloody Scotland.

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One response to “Breaking the boundary

  1. Sounds like a great festival – only disappointed I couldn’t get to it. I hope to hear more about it!

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