Tag Archives: Barrington Stoke

Potty

They are, when it comes to royal princes. After The Queen’s Knickers (how very dare they?) and The Royal Nappy, Nicholas Allan has come up with The Prince and the Potty. Now, do we have a royal baby birthday coming up, or not?

(It’s today.)

It stands to reason that a boy who had to have a royal nappy must be equally regal in the potty department. There are lots of potties. Some are better than others. But when you are out representing great-grandma you can occasionally be caught short, in which case any potty will do.

Even an ordinary one.

9781782952572

Michael Rosen has been known to be slightly potty, I believe. (I mean that in the best possible way.) Here in Wolfman, illustrated by Chris Mould, in a special Barrington Stoke dyslexia friendly edition, there is a wolfman on the loose.

He scares everyone he meets, and he appears to be after the Chief of Police. The reason for that is slightly potty, too.

Wolfman-01

Over the Line

WWI football, but not that match, the one we all know about.

Tom Palmer writes about a young football player going to war, and he’s not the first one. A couple of books I’ve read recently begin with young men and their hopes of becoming successful – professional – players, only to find WWI getting in the way. It wasn’t the done thing to ‘avoid’ signing up because you were about to get your big break.

Jack in Over the Line is a really good player, but once he’s played his first season he enlists, along with team mates as well as players from ‘the competition,’ and they are placed in the Footballers’ Battalion, who play against other soldiers when not in the trenches.

Tom Palmer, Over the Line

This is another engaging Barrington Stoke story, and because of the soccer aspect it’s refreshingly different from other WWI books. As it’s a short book, it can only afford the briefest of description of life in the trenches. This doesn’t matter – in fact, it possibly helps – as the stark horror of war is painted in a few words.

Some of the people around Jack die, but by the end of the book the reader realises that surviving the war isn’t necessarily the wonderful fate you’d think it would be.

A very footbally war story, and interesting, even for non-soccer fans.

Tom will launch his book with the help of the Manchester Children’s Book Festival on Sunday 6th July. Twice, in one day. Be there!

Shadow Girl

Sally Nicholls, Shadow Girl

This is a beautiful book. I cried. And whereas I don’t always want to keep a Barrington Stoke book after I’ve read it, Shadow Girl by Sally Nicholls will stay right here. It is that wonderful.

I especially appreciate Sally naming one of her characters Maddy.

Shadow Girl is about two girls in care; Maddy in a children’s home and Clare who is living with a foster mother. Both have tough lives, but feel better for having found the other. It means they have someone to talk to.

Except, one day Maddy fails to turn up, and Clare doesn’t know what to do. She finally speaks to her foster mother about it, and her life changes radically.

(Short review, I know. But the book is only 67 pages, and that’s Barrington Stoke pages. I loved every single one of them, and didn’t at any time feel I was reading a ‘dyslexic story.’)

You just have to love Shadow Girl.

The Night Raid

Boys will be boys. They were – mostly – just the same back in Roman times. Or do I mean Greek?

Caroline Lawrence has written her first Barrington Stoke story, and it is both an exciting read and quite educational for people like me. If you’re a bit shaky on the Classics, then The Night Raid is for you.

Caroline Lawrence, The Night Raid

It begins with the fall of Troy, when two young boys, Rye and Nisus, flee for their lives, having lost family members. Both want revenge, but first have to start new lives with the leader of the Trojans, Aeneas.

The reader learns what happened to the Trojans in exile, and how they arrived in Italy, years later.

If the story sounds at all familiar, it will be because a chap called Virgil wrote a poem called the Aeneid, and Caroline has borrowed from that to tell us what happened to the teenagers, Nisus and Rye.

I think it’s fantastic the way an author can take something old and seemingly difficult and bring it to a new audience by re-writing something that many of us will happily avoid for as long as we possibly can.

Thank you for educating me a little bit, Caroline.

Soul Mates and an Old Dog

That’s not the title of a book, btw. I was simply thinking how great it is that I have two Barrington Stoke books here; one for girls and one for boys. I know, I shouldn’t be quite so categorical, but in this instance it does seem to me that Lee Weatherly’s Soul Mates is pretty satisfyingly girly, while Bali Rai has written an inspirational story for teenage boys in Old Dog New Tricks. What’s more, it covers the ‘immigrant’ angle too, even though Harvey is no immigrant. He just happens to look like one.

Bali Rai, Old Dog New Tricks

Harvey and his family are sikhs, and when they move into the house next door to old Mick, they soon find out how unpleasant their new neighbour can be. But they are friendly and persistent people, so try really hard to make contact with the lonely old man.

The story provides a good mix of ordinary life for people in Britain, whether sikh or white or black. As Harvey says, if Mick were to close his eyes, he wouldn’t be able to hear that Harvey is a foreigner. Because he isn’t.

I learned something new, too, that if I’m hungry or lonely, I can pop round to my nearest gurdwara for food and company. That sounds most civilised, and I hope Bali hasn’t set an avalanche rolling by introducing this sikh tradition in his book.

L A Weatherly, Soul Mates

Lee’s Soul Mates is about precisely that. Two teenagers who for years have dreamed about each other, despite never having met. They just know the other is their soul mate.

And when Iris and Nate do meet, they realise they have come face to face with their dream person. But not just their soul mate, unfortunately. Their dreams have also had a certain scary aspect to them, and they immediately feel this evil danger closing in on them.

They have to work out who or what it is, and whether they and their love can survive this threat. As I said, very nicely girly and romantic.

Barrington Stoke are on the right track, commissioning stories like these. Everybody deserves to read good stuff.

The long Carnegie

I was surprised to read that publishing the longlist for the Carnegie was a new idea. Surely I’d got that wrong, somehow?

Ah. Have checked. I know what’s new. The longlist. Before, the long list used to be all the nominated books, and then you got to the shortlist. So presumably we are skipping the very long list this time. Glad to have sorted that out.

It’s a good list. Some I have read, others I’ve not had time to get to. And yet more I have not got close enough to, to be able to consider reading. Two are from my own best of 2013 list (I’d like to think they visited and compared notes), so I’d be especially grateful if they could hand out the medal to Binny or to Brock.* If not, any good book will do. The better the better, though, if you know what I mean.

2014 CILIP Carnegie Medal longlist

As far as the picture books go, I haven’t read a single one. I don’t recognise the titles either, so have hopefully not shown a shocking lack of interest in what will turn out to be a really magnificent book.

2014 Kate Greenaway Medal longlist

*It is especially nice to find a Barrington Stoke novel on the list.

Tilly’s Promise

Would that going to war as a soldier were as hard for someone with special needs as it is for them to read books about war. But we know from Private Peaceful that this was not the case, and here Linda Newbery gives us her version of WWI and those who should have been allowed not to be sent out at all.

Linda Newbery, Tilly's Promise

Linda has written this dyslexia friendly book for Barrington Stoke, the first one out this year of remembering 1914 and all that came after. Tilly’s Promise is very much a similar story to what Linda has already written about for able readers, and it’s good to see that this can now be made available for others as well.

Tilly and her sweetheart Harry promise to be true to each other as first he goes to war, and then she joins as a nurse. But what it is mainly about is Harry’s enforced promise to look out for Tilly’s ‘simple’ brother Georgie, once he is made to join up as well.

The inspiration for Georgie came from a Siegfred Sassoon poem, and like Linda’s other WWI novels, it’s losely based on Vera Brittain’s Testament of Youth.

This is of necessity a short book, but all the suffering and the real history of war is in here. I don’t like the need for these remembrance books, but it’s there if you want to find out more. One of the things Tilly learned was that the Germans were the same as the British. No monsters.

(Beautifully embroidered cover by Stewart Easton.)

Brock

I loved this book! Anthony McGowan has written the most perfect badger book imaginable, and it’s dyslexia friendly. It had been compared to Kes, which alarmed me somewhat, although I did realise it was meant as a compliment.

For a dyslexia friendly story, this is a long book. Sometimes I hesitate to recommend the rather short books to normal readers, simply because the book will be over almost as soon as you’ve begun. This being 130pages – and so very good – I think everyone might want to read it.

Knowing from the blurb that animals would be harmed, I calmed down as soon as I met the old badger in the first chapter. He knew things weren’t going to end well, but he had a job to do and he was courageous. It helped knowing him.

The book also has issues, which is another thing I’m not dead keen on, but this is handled so well that it just makes you happy and satisfied. Nicky (I’m not sure of his age. I’m guessing 13?) has to look out for his brother Kenny who is ‘simple,’ as their dad is in a bad state after their mum left.

Then there are the local teen thugs, with their dogs. And there are the badgers. You can imagine.

But good can come from bad, and it does. I almost cried.

A Lily, A Rose

Very romantic. Satisfyingly romantic. Sally Nicholls has written a dyslexia friendly book for Barrington Stoke, and it is really very short, but she has put so much into it.

Sally Nicholls, A Lily, A Rose

Set in an era when the heroine’s father had been to war against Robert the Bruce, you know it was a long time ago. So it’s mostly castles and hunting and that kind of thing. And chess.

Elinor is very fond of chess, and beats her beloved cousin Dan most of the time. She is lonely in that castle, with only Dan, her horse and her maid to talk to.

And then her father makes plans for her to marry someone. Not Dan, but an older man. What is she to do? What can she do?

I felt a certain tingling when I worked out what must happen. Very satisfying.

This is a short book with plenty of content.

Love you, Moose Baby

Barrington Stoke certainly know how to pick them. Their latest batch of anniversary books is as good as you’d expect.

I would obviously have liked to find a new book by Meg Rosoff, but with us waiting for her next ‘normal book’ already, getting a dyslexia friendly version of Vamoose is pretty good.

In fact, it’s almost better, because it shows what you can do by adapting an already great read. OK, Vamoose was a short book, and as Moose Baby it must be even shorter. But what a story!

Meg Rosoff, Moose Baby

The plot is your perfectly normal story about a teen pregnancy that results in the birth of a moose. These unusual animal births have started occurring, and there are parental support groups, and that kind of thing. But if you are only 17 you might find them a little middleaged.

Being young parents could well be why Moose Baby’s arrival works out so well. More stamina and less preconceived notions of what’s what. Little Moosie has a good life with his young and loving parents, and the grandparents eventually come round too.

This is a Meg Rosoff tale, so expect the unexpected.

You just have to love Moosie. And his doting parents, who dote as good as any of us, and then some.