Six Dinner Sid

It wasn’t long since I had another sneaky cat on here, but it’s time for Sid. I have searched high and low and can only conclude we don’t own a copy of the book, but never mind. Sid has made enough of an impression on me anyway. Could be the idea that six dinners is better than one.

I’ve been equally unsuccessful with Inga Moore, who wrote the book. The most I’ve found is that she is still alive, which is nice to know. With a name like Inga I wondered about any possible Swedish connections, but she is down as English on one of the few sites I found her. She did win the Smarties prize for Sid, though.

Six Dinner Sid

The book about sneaky Sid is really a reflection on society, and whether people speak to each other, rather than about a hungry cat. We meet Sid when he lives in a street with very unfriendly people, who never speak to their neighbours. That’s why they don’t find out that “their” cat also belongs to five other houses nearby. It’s only when Sid falls ill and gets taken to the vet by all of his owners, that the truth is revealed. Sid’s loving owners then kick him out.

Lucky for Sid, because he finds a friendly street with inhabitants who talk. And they don’t mind sharing their cat with a few of the neighbours.

7 responses to “Six Dinner Sid

  1. Just around the time that Six Dinner Sid came out my Catwalk was published (Frances Lincoln, illustrated by Joanna Burroughs – wh is married to Chris Riddell). It was the same plot, except that my cat was , unusually but not impossibly, ginger and the reason the other neighbours hadn’t seen “him” for days was that “he” was in the last house in the terrace giving birth. Everyone got a kitten and became a lot more neighbourly. I loved it and was very miffed that Inga Moore’s book won a prize and mine didn’t even get paperbacked. Still, I think it was big in Holland.

  2. That’s another good example of how more than one person has a very similar idea at the same time. It seems to occur more often than you’d think possible.

  3. I love Six Dinner Sid and will definitely try and dig out a copy of Catwalk – sounds fab!
    I’m relieved to hear that I’m not the only one who’s had the same idea as someone else at the same time. I’ve done it twice now with my picture books texts and it’s SO frustrating. (And why does it make me feel like I’ve done something sneaky and wrong, like copying someone else in an exam, even when I couldn’t possibly have known?!)

  4. It just does, I think. Something to do with a natural sense of fair play.

    When Neil Gaiman was asked the other day whether he felt JK Rowling had stolen Harry Potter from him, he said an emphatic no.

  5. Ha ha! We have a Sid. He’s called Alfie and partly lives with my two cats and partly with everyone else in the street. Oddly enough we initially dubbed him ‘Ashley’, so even got his name almost right.

  6. If I wrote about cats every day, you would get bored eventually, wouldn’t you? Otherwise it does feel as if I only need to mention cats to get people’s attention. Crafty creatures. The cats, I mean.

  7. I read a very similar children’s book to this about a fat orange cat who also got fed by everyone in the neighbourhood. It had beautiful illustrations and after the neighbourhood worked out that the cat was fed by all of them, the neighbourhood came together for a meal on long trestle tables with food from each person. It may have been called Catwalk, Mary, I am not sure, I loved the illustrations.
    I could read about cats all day. Still one of the best books I have read about cats is The Cat that (which) Looked At The Sky – Thea somebody

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