The Tattooed Girl

I don’t see why millions shouldn’t flock to read this book, edited by Dan Burstein. Newspapers all over the world are full of articles speculating about everything and anything to do with Stieg Larsson and his Millennium trilogy. Whether or not the people responsible for those articles know very much about Stieg or Sweden is best left out of this discussion. I have read good ones and I have seen some awful ones. Most of them repeat the same few facts over and over.

Dan Burstein, Arne de Keijzer and John-Henri Holmberg, The Tattooed Girld

In The Tattooed Girl Dan and his co-authors Arne de Keijzer and John-Henri Holmberg have collected many previously published articles as well as pieces written especially for the book. Between them they cover a lot, if not everything, to do with Stieg Larsson, who is unable to put anyone right about what’s true and what isn’t.

I have speculated a lot about this book while it was being written, and to be honest, I wasn’t sure how useful I thought it’d be. But I have to admit I found it good, covering most of what you’d want to know about the books and about Stieg and anything else that might have influenced the story about Mikael Blomkvist and Lisbeth Salander.

Without Stieg’s old friend John-Henri this book would hardly have been worth reading. It would have been merely a catalogue of articles on Sweden and men who hate women, in some form or other. To have someone who knew Stieg for over 30 years write about his life like this makes all the difference.

I’m only slightly younger than Stieg, and I find it reassuring that we appear to have done many similar things when we were young, reading the same books, experiencing similar political issues, and so on. I trust someone who was actually there, rather than a writer who just dug up some facts about a stranger.

There are other contributors to The Tattooed Girl who perhaps have less reason to be there. I don’t feel it’s relevant to read about Lars Kepler in this book. Authors like Karin Alfredsson on the other hand have every reason to be a part of this.

Between them the many Larsson specialists paint a portrait of Sweden and the period during which Stieg wrote his books. They can’t explain everything, but they come close.

The Tattooed Girl might be an unauthorised guide, but it should take care of what fans want to know.

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5 responses to “The Tattooed Girl

  1. It may be very good, but I am sure they made a gross mistake by not including my article about Lisbeth & Pippi (they actually asked me, but when I said yes, they suddenly didn´t want it any more – I am sure you know the type)

  2. I think they asked a lot of people. And at least yours was about the books, unlike Lars Kepler’s which was about themselves. But I gather John-Henri had lots more written than they had space for.

  3. I am sure they asked all and sundry, but of course ´Lars Kepler´ is more famous than me 😉

  4. I agree that John-Henri Holmberg’s contributions – especially about the mistakes and neglects in the translation – was the most interesting in the book.

  5. Pingback: The Bookwitch on The Tattooed Girl: | The Tattooed Girl

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