Dragon Loves Penguin – live

In the end there was no 90-year-old fiddle-maker in the audience. But Debi Gliori had me, and that was embarrassment enough for one day.

Dragon Loves Penguin is one of my most favourite of Debi’s books. Not so much because I love dragons (certainly not with the passion Debi reserves for them), but because I love mummies who love their babies. It might sound boringly traditional – not to mention obvious – but it needs to be said. ‘Love and time, the greatest gifts of all.’

Debi Gliori

After explaining how she came to write – and draw – Dragon Loves Penguin, Debi read the whole book to us. Not just a bit, but the lot. It can still make me cry.

Debi started off by drawing us an egg. Come to think of it, she ended by drawing us an egg. Too.

Her life long ambition has been to put penguins and dragons in one book, and she showed us her older books The Trouble With Dragons, and Penguin Post, about a daddy penguin who attempts to hatch a parcel. (You can’t.)

This was a great event. Sometimes a young audience can be too young, but here they were just right, and what amazing questions they asked!

How do dragons fly? Well, it helps if Debi has remembered to draw wings (she has been known to forget). But it’s probably by magic.

How did the egg end up on the ice? Yes, how? The baby penguin (in the egg) will freeze to death if left unattended for more than two minutes, so we decided that dragon had been very fast, because ‘a page is a long time.’

What does a dragon’s egg look like? Lovely, is the answer. And orangey, but with some magenta in it. And did you know that charcoal is merely a burnt stick?

Debi mentioned my old favourite Ffup, who makes toast by breathing on bread. It strikes me as most efficient. I’d like to do that, too.

Debi Gliori

(As you can see, Debi spent a lot of time actually talking to fans. I think this was about school.)

2 responses to “Dragon Loves Penguin – live

  1. Oh! Those eyebrows! Dear heavens – I had no idea I could look quite so…dragonish. I absolutely love this photograph. You’ve captured something of the reality of the experience of the aftermath of speaking at a book festival and being asked very, very searching questions by small readers. There is no escape. You have to come up with an answer. Hence the eyebrows…

  2. ‘s what I thought. You’re not exactly ignoring those girls, or merely being polite.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s