Blueberries

There I was, in my hotel room, stuffing myself with blueberries, feeling rather like Putte i Blåbärsskogen. (That’s a literary ‘thing’ which makes my breakfast a valid Bookwitch blog post…)

Putte is a small boy, who will forever be connected with bilberry woods to most Swedes. (And yes, there are bilberries and there are blueberries. It’s the elk versus moose conundrum of forest fruit.) It was most likely bilberries Putte was eating. They are smaller than the enormous blueberries we have got used to from America. Big, like everything American.

But I decided not to worry about my Putte-like status, as I was feeling ‘calm like a Greek yoghurt.’ I mean, I ate the berries with Greek [style] yoghurt.

And no, I’m not a ‘little on the cinnamon.’ At all.

Which statement leads me almost seamlessly to this link here. It’s all about the pride Swedes take in their weird ways of saying things. Yes, it is rather funny translating idiomatic phrases. By their very nature they just can’t come out well in another language.*

But Swedish isn’t the only language with odd sayings. I suspect most languages have strange offerings to, well, offer. I can’t say I feel that having egg on one’s face makes it into Swedish – or any other language – with terrific ease either. Let me see; ‘Jag har ägg i ansiketet…’

No, that will definitely make me appear to be a little on the cinnamon. And me a non-drinker and all.

Have a couple of blueberries!

(*My apologies for the translations being slightly wanting. It’s what happens to us foreigners. We think we know it all, and then it turns out we don’t.)

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