Tag Archives: Dyslexia

The Boy and the Globe

Did anyone notice that it’s just been the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare? Not that I feel it’s quite proper to celebrate anniversaries of deaths, but still.

There are a lot of books out with some kind of Shakespeare connection. Tony Bradman’s The Boy and the Globe is one of them, and it’s a Barrington Stoke Conkers book. It’s the one I mentioned a few days ago as having given me so much more pleasure than the book I abandoned immediately before it.

What’s so fun is seeing what different authors can do with the same theme. The Boy and the Globe is just one story set in 1611, featuring a young orphan. Toby is forced to take up a life of crime in order to eat, but it’s not something he wants to do. By chance he ends up thieving at the Globe one day, and is discovered, in more ways than one.

The boy is befriended by Shakespeare, who is struggling to write a new play, and inspired by a book Toby has just read, he suggests the plot for Will’s next masterpiece, The Tempest.

Tony Bradman and Tom Morgan-Jones, The Boy and the Globe

He gets to do a bit of acting, too, as Shakespeare writes a part for him, and from then on it’s less crime and more theatre for Toby.

Lots of fun and pretty instructive of life in London at the time, as well as giving a theoretical glimpse into the life of Will. I expect any parent of a child who reads this to be forced to make a trip to the Globe before long. (If they are careless enough to mention it’s a real place.)

Illustrations by Tom Morgan-Jones, and lots of Funne Activities for Boyes & Girls at the back of the book. (We really ought to celebrate dead people a bit more.)

I love you, Barrington Stoke

Did I mention my feelings for Barrington Stoke before? Can’t be said often enough.

I have got to the stage where I could happily read nothing but Barrington Stoke books. Well, almost. There are a few people whose ‘ordinary’ books I do want to read, as well, but if fate intervened and I was told I could only read Barrington Stoke, I’d not exactly be suffering.

Why are they so good? My current theory is that it’s because Barrington Stoke commission books from authors; be they long established, or more recent. None of this sitting in the garret for the authors, writing, hoping to be published, fearing they might not be.

Already published authors are rejected far too often these days. Even very good ones. And here I mean good authors, and good books. Perhaps because they don’t happen to fit the very latest image of what a publisher is trying to do. Never mind that readers are waiting for the next book from those whose work they have enjoyed previously.

And maybe because small is beautiful? There have been slightly more ‘normal’ length novels coming my way recently, by which I mean 200-250 pages. I rejoice every time. Longer is not better.

Barrington Stoke certainly know how to publish a marvellous story in 85 pages or thereabouts, without making you feel as if you’re being sold short. As the books are both brief and – for me – easy to read, I have more time for more stories by more authors. It’s a win-win situation.

A couple of weeks ago I began reading a 500p adult crime novel, which I’d looked forward to. It was intended as a treat. I gave up on it after a few chapters. Yes, maybe it would have got more interesting, but I couldn’t help feeling that it ought to have started interestingly, if it had such intentions. Besides, I had loads more books to choose from, and the next in line was a Barrington Stoke, and it delivered 100% satisfaction.

So that was proper long adult novel 0 – children’s short dyslexia friendly book 1. This happens a lot. 💜

Car Wash Wish

Isn’t this just a fantastic book title? It makes me want to go round muttering those three words to myself, trying to avoid twisting my tongue with the wash wish thing.

Sita Brahmachari has written another great book for Barrington Stoke, and this time it’s a nicely timed autism story, for National Autism Awareness Month.

Sita Brahmachari, Car Wash Wish

14-year-old Hudson is an aspie, and his dad is one as well, which is why Hudson now lives with his mum and stepdad and his unborn half-sibling, currently going by the name of Zygote. Hudson likes the letter Z. A lot.

To make matters worse, his dad’s dad has died and there is a funeral to go to, to dress for. His mum always felt that her late father-in-law, who had Alzheimer’s, took up all her husband’s attention, which is why they split up.

Hudson just wants to understand the world, and to be with his dad, as well as with his mum, and Zygote, with whom he chats by himself in order to introduce their family.

There is a car wash in his dad’s past, and the importance of this becomes evident as you read the book. That’s the car wash wish.

Lovely.

Monster mum

Beowulf for dyslexic readers. And for me. I’m not saying I couldn’t read the ‘normal’ Beowulf, but the fact remains I’ve never felt the urge to give him a go.

Here in Brian Patten’s short easy version, with irresistibly monsterous illustrations by Chris Riddell, you have it all. Well, most of it; the core of what matters.

Brian Patten and Chris Riddell, Monster Slayer

In Monster Slayer, we learn about the King’s party to which Grendel the monster wasn’t invited (a mistake, I believe), and how he discovers this and comes and eats some of the King’s best warriors. Which is not good.

Many try to kill Grendel, but he is one of the worst monsters around, and it’s not until Beowulf turns up that Grendel can be beaten. And then they have another party! (I can’t help but feel that they should party less.)

Even horrible monsters have mothers, and Grendel’s monster mum comes looking for revenge for her son’s death. Beowulf needs all his strength and cunning to deal with this furious mother.

This is the perfect way to read a classic, enabling you to be like everyone else, while also learning about Beowulf.

A Dark Trade

Mary Hooper, A Dark Trade

Mary Hooper has done what she does so well, which is to take the tales of poor servant girls in the past, and put them in a book that anyone can read. So often this kind of story only comes as an old, fat classic of 500 pages or more, and with small print to boot. Thank you to Barrington Stoke who understand that everyone would want to read this.

In A Dark Trade we meet orphan Gina, who at 16 is ready to leave the cruel orphanage and go to work. In her case a seemingly lovely big house in London in the mid-1800s. But of course it doesn’t work out like that. Big houses, however beautiful, come with their own problems, and in this case it’s a young master with the wrong idea of what a girl servant is for.

Gina makes a run for it, and disguises herself as a boy. But it’s the usual fire and frying pan scenario, and she is no better off as a male shop assistant.

Mary occasionally lets a book end less well than you’d hoped for, so I wasn’t sure what she might have up her sleeve this time. Read the book and find out!

Queen of the Silver Arrow

Caroline Lawrence has written a story to inspire girls that they can do more. Admittedly, the cover features a beautiful girl with a bow and arrow, and I understand that recent films (and the books behind them) have made bows and arrows the thing to have. But why not?

Caroline Lawrence, Queen of the Silver Arrow

This re-working of Virgil’s The Aeneid for Barrington Stoke tells the story of Camilla, who is the Queen of the Silver Arrow. Her father, who’s a King, brought her up in the woods where he fled with his baby daughter, and she learns to be of service to the Goddess Diana.

Camilla’s story becomes well known in the neighbourhood, and Acca who is the same age, dreams of being like her, and so do some of the rich girls in town. Eventually they all meet and Camilla trains the girls to be warriors, something that becomes necessary when the Trojans arrive.

Violent and bloody in parts, it’s still a beautiful piece of history (it was real, wasn’t it?), and as I said, very inspiring for girls. It needn’t all be about getting married. Or at least not without doing something worthwhile first.

Sometimes we all want to be like an Amazon, although perhaps stopping short at baring a breast.

At the World’s End

At the World’s End by Catherine Fisher is a short, but intense, book.

Catherine Fisher, At the World's End

Set in the near future, something dreadful has happened, and 14-year-old Caz is one of a few survivors who took refuge in a shop when whatever it was happened, and she has lived there for nine years. They believe the air outside is not safe and it’s so cold no one can survive.

But how can you be sure?

Caz and her friend Will are the next sacrifices to be sent out there, when food gets – even more – scarce.

You are literally on your toes as you read, and with a title like this, I wasn’t sure how gruesome an end it was possible to go for.

Read, and you will find out.