Tag Archives: Gareth P Jones

The bad deal

What a shame. A celebrity author who is hurt – or perhaps merely surprised – he doesn’t feature on any best books lists. Despite his books being liked by children!

Good grief.

Not DW this time, but his namesake David Baddiel, about whom I’ve previously said not altogether lovely things. I note how naïve I was, now that I’ve read this blog post by Gareth P Jones. (Who, incidentally came up with a very similar title to his post. Great minds.) Gareth is an actual children’s author. The not rich kind.

The kindest and fairest thing I can say to Mr Baddiel is that he might be quite a good author of children’s books. I don’t know, obviously, not having been supplied with a copy when I didn’t want to engage in one-sided publicity for him. However, there are a lot of quite good authors out there. And they can’t all make the best lists, no matter how much they wish.

I know this because I very recently looked through my 2018 books, and having only read somewhere between 100 and 150 books, some of which don’t qualify for best of Bookwitch rules, I had to discard a big number of really excellent books. Books I’d enjoyed a lot. Because I’d enjoyed a few others even more.

That’s how lists work. It’s rather like winning Wimbledon. They are playing because they are the best, and they don’t finish until the bestest of them all has beaten the rest.

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Bookwitch bites #72

Today will be mainly about what happens in toilets. And I’m relieved (no, not in that way!) that some of you love me a little. Thank you to all five who like me. I’m actually ecstatic to find I have more fans than Declan Burke on Crime Always Pays, who only has ‘three regular readers.’ Or so he claims. And I’m one of them. Not sure who the other two are.

My tale about the sweet singing in the Ladies at the Lowry caused the nice press person from the Theatre by the Lake in Keswick to send me a very kind email. This in turn made me aware of the theatre’s book festival, Words by the Water. I know, everywhere does them, but it feels rather special to have something bookish in that lovely theatre setting. I just wish I could go. It started yesterday, and whereas it mainly seems to be adult authors, I did notice Annabel Pitcher in the programme.

The next toilet ‘incident’ also involves a lovely email (perhaps I shouldn’t have asked for sympathy?), from a librarian I encountered in the toilet queue at the Philippines Embassy (as you do) at the launch of Candy Gourlay’s Tall Story a year and a half ago. Her school – where she does her librarian stuff – has a novel (to me) kind of book competition to encourage reading. And I’m proud that I inspired one of the books to be picked. (That would be the one I never finished reading.) I’d like to think I’m also partly to blame for the school’s newly started blog. I wish them the best of fun with their Battle of the Books.

I believe I will now move swiftly and virtually seamlessly from toilets to libraries. Blue Peter was broadcasting live from the John Rylands Library in Manchester on Thursday. (And I wasn’t there! Small sob.) Both their book awards had reached a conclusion, so Gareth P Jones was there as his werewolf mystery The Considine Curse was voted Blue Peter Book of the Year. He looked quite happy.

And the Best Children’s Book of the Last 10 Years was won by Jeff Kinney for his bestselling Diary of a Wimpy Kid. He looked quite happy too. And like me, he wasn’t actually there. He spoke to the assembled Blue Peter children in a recorded message.

Connie Fisher, Michael Xavier and Lucy van Gasse

I really need to remember that Blue Peter broadcast from Media City in Salford these days. And that is relatively close. Oddly enough, I had been to Manchester earlier on Thursday. And to end this post in a vaguely toilet related manner, I almost passed the John Rylands after stuffing envelopes for the Hallé, in the company of a volunteer from the Lowry who was enthusing about the Media City gardens, and the ‘celebrities’ one can see there. One of the stuffings was for Wonderful Town, the collaboration between the Royal Exchange Theatre, the Hallé and the Lowry. And it was the toilet from the launch which featured in my second paragraph above, and the volunteer also experienced a slight incident with the Bridgewater Hall’s facilities on Thursday. It was a mere misunderstanding, and she wasn’t in the dark for long.

I know. Things stopped making sense about 100 words ago. Sorry.