Tag Archives: Marnie Riches

The Girl Who Got Revenge

George, George… What shall we do with you? You run into danger with scant thought for your safety, and you run from commitment to a man who’s a bit too ‘dense’ to commit back. If it’s OK to call our detective dense?

In this fifth outing for Dr George McKenzie, she’s still using very bad language and falling out ever faster with the people around her. Van Den Bergen doesn’t understand her personal needs because he’s a grandfather with duties. And he has a lorryload of immigrants, one of whom is dead, to deal with.

Plus the unexpected death rate for 95-year-old men in Amsterdam is on the up.

There’s a lot going on here, but gruesome though the deaths are, they are not nearly as bad as they were, even if Marnie Riches still kills and maims quite inventively. Today’s crimes might have something to do with the war, but how?

Marnie Riches, The Girl Who Got Revenge

I made some pretty intelligent guesses as to what and who and how, and I was wrong about every single one. This is good stuff, if you can tolerate the blood and the suffering, and I don’t mean Van Den Bergen’s stomach. (But I have now gone off fruit and veg imports from the Netherlands, rather.)

Have made a note of how to arm myself for those awkward meetings with mass murderers. Thanks, George.

(All five George McKenzie novels are now available as paperbacks. High time they were!)

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More George, and more Duffy

Great news on the crime front!

Today sees the publication of the fifth George McKenzie novel by Marnie Riches, The Girl Who Got Revenge. It’s ‘only’ the ebook today, but don’t despair. On May 3rd we get the whole collected George on paper for the first time! I can’t tell you how much I am looking forward to that. Except I just did. Sort of.

Marnie Riches, The Girl Who Got Revenge

I imagine Marnie is equally pleased to see her first crime babies in actual print, after her Born Bad series which came last year.

I will get back to you when I’ve read about George’s revenge.

And on the Irish front, it seems we are to be rewarded with three more Duffy novels from Adrian McKinty. I had suspected the worst, but it would appear that Duffy didn’t sail into a permanent sunset after all. In fact, with news of three books, I will dare hope, and expect, that Sean Duffy lives through at least two and a half of them.

Adrian McKinty

So, plenty more Irish history for Duffy to solve crimes in, and no one could be happier than I am. Not sure how long a wait there will be, but it will be worth it.

Good news too for the Resident IT Consultant who has belatedly begun reading all six books. Don’t know what took him so long!

The #22 profile – Marnie Riches

She likes her Swedes. That’s always a good thing. Marnie Riches is about to spill a few beans, to celebrate the fact that you can actually have the Kindle version of her new novel Born Bad absolutely free if you hurry. Do it! Or pay money for the paper book. Or even both.

Marnie sent me a really beautiful photo of herself, smiling. Now, I don’t want you to get too comfortable, so here is a non-smiling Marnie instead, ready to tell you about herself and her writing:

Marnie Riches (by Phil Tragen)

How many books did you write before the one that was your first published book?

All the books, ever! I slaved over a novelization of an epic 12th century Dutch poem that I eventually turned into a rather crap YA historical thriller. I lovingly put together a fully illustrated picture book about a messy hippo called Billy. I gave it the imaginative title of, Billy, the Messy Hippo. I wrote three middle grade novels, which turned out to be practice. I wrote six historical adventure novels for 7+, which were published under the pseudonym, Chris Blake (the first six in HarperCollins’ Time-Hunters series). But still not in my name! I wrote half of a YA manuscript, which got put to one side and forgotten about because of writer’s block nonsense and because it was…nonsense. I wrote a women’s novel that’s STILL on submission, even though it’s totes hilaire (yes, that was said ironically). Then, I was finally published with The Girl Who Wouldn’t Die – my crime-thriller (not for kids) about a criminologist, set mainly in Amsterdam. I wrote three more George McKenzie thrillers, but the entire series is still digital only. SO…my first paperback didn’t come out until March 2017. Technically then, Born Bad – my tale of Manchester’s gangland – is my first book made from actual book. That’s many thousands of books before I got published. Luckily, I’m better with words than numbers, much to my accountant’s chagrin.

Best place for inspiration?

Walking amongst normal people.

Would you ever consider writing under a pseudonym? Perhaps you already do?

My Time-Hunters books were published under the Chris Blake pseudonym as there were several writers working on the series at once. I’m fine with that. I’d happily write again under a pseudonym and fully expect any of my women’s fiction to be published as such. Many crime-writers relaunch their careers as debuts by writing under pseudonyms.

What would you never write about?

I’ve written about people-trafficking, the sex industry, Charlemagne the Great, fairies, dead Egyptians, Vikings, organ harvesting, paedophile rings, missing children, Mexican cartels, gangsters and Manchester. I’ll pretty much tackle anything as long as it doesn’t involve too much hoovering.

Through your writing: the most unexpected person you’ve met, or the most unexpected place you’ve ended up in?

I’ve spent too much time trawling Amsterdam’s red light district and also the medieval churches of the low-lands and Germany. But that’s more to do with my being a little odd, a history dork and a linguist than being a writer. I met a couple of very interesting criminologists and had an exchange with the head of forensic pathology at Manchester Royal Infirmary. Unexpected enough for you, Bookwitch? I could tell you I also met the Duke of Edinburgh on many an occasion, but then, I worked for him, so that was fully expected.

Which of your characters would you most like to be?

I’d like to be George McKenzie, of course, because she’s even mouthier than me and doesn’t grunt when she bends over. She’s got better hair too.

Do you think that having a film made of one of your books would be a good or a bad thing?

This would be wonderful because those enjoying the TV programme or film would rush out and buy all of my books. I could have Born Bad merchandising with special Sheila O’Brien dolls and a branded range of antacids, “As used by Chief Inspector Van den Bergen”. It would rock.

What is the strangest question you’ve been asked at an event?

I haven’t been asked anything really odd yet. I was asked at a bookshop recently what advice I’d give to the reader’s 24 year old son, who aspired to be an author. My answer involved living a little longer and doing a good deal more before attempting to write.

Do you have any unexpected skills?

I can lay laminate flooring, tile badly and decorate. I can pave a patio. I can router out a hole in a worktop for a kitchen sink. I bake brilliant bread. I play bass and rhythm guitar. I’m excellent at sewing on buttons. I’m really good at swearing.

The Famous Five or Narnia?

Narnia, any day of the week. Everyone knows Enid Blyton’s best books were “The Mystery of…” books and “The Thingy of Adventure” books.

Who is your most favourite Swede?

Bookwitch, of course! Then, my ex-husband. Then, Stieg Larsson, for giving us Salander. Then, Saga Norén.

How do you arrange your books at home? In a Billy? By colour, or alphabetically?

In packing boxes, currently. I moved house almost a year ago and still haven’t unpacked for fear that the various infestations in my superannuated bungalow will see my books as a food source or new habitat.

Which book would you put in the hands of an unwilling eight-year-old boy reader?

My Time-Hunters books. Although my own son is a reluctant reader and wouldn’t read them. He did, however, go bonkers over the Diary of a Wimpy Kid and other Jeff Kinney books.

If you have to choose between reading or writing, which would it be?

Writing. Some might say writers are just a bunch of narcissists telling big fibs. I say, every author has stories inside them, trying to punch their way out. We get dented in the head if we don’t tip those stories onto the page. So, the writing comes first.

Marnie Riches, Born Bad

The Duke of Edinburgh! Who’d have thought? And strictly speaking Marnie chose far too many Swedes (I said favourite!), but I’m feeling generous today. In my head Marnie is George McKenzie, and no one sensible would want to hoover unnecessarily. I could do with a new patio, though, Marnie.

Marnie??

Where did she go?

From the launch pad

There are only so many simultaneous launches a witch can attend. Last night offered two; both of which I dearly wanted to go to.

Marnie Riches, Born Bad

Marnie Riches brought her new baby, crime-thriller novel Born Bad, into the world at Waterstones Deansgate (that’s Manchester, folks), and it felt like such a special event that for weeks I believed it would be the one to take me back there at long last. After all, what else would I be doing on a dark February night?

The answer to that is three things, and being exhausted and having the builders [still] in were two of them. I sensibly declined in the end, and no sooner had I done that than James Oswald declared he was also launching his new novel at exactly the same time, at Waterstones West End (that’s Edinburgh), and this did feel a lot more feasible. But in the end the same three things conspired against me and I didn’t go.

Sigh.

I trust books were launched successfully anyway, and that Written in Bones is now sailing somewhere well past Princes Street Gardens, possibly as far as the Meadows, where it might encounter the dead body I told you about yesterday. If James continues to write and continues to launch, it is my ambition in life to go along to one of these events. Perhaps the trains will even run all evening at some distant point in time.

James Oswald, Wriiten in Bones

Back to Marnie and Manchester. Born Bad is about bad people doing bad things in Manchester. It has a great cover, and I’m so happy for Marnie, whose first paper book crime novel it is. The George McKenzie books are ebooks (they ought to be in paper as well!). There was mention of booze with the invite, but as I wasn’t going to drink any, I reckon my absense won’t make a difference.

I’ll get to Manchester one day. And Edinburgh. Well, the latter could be next week.

Meanwhile I’ll polish up the broom.

The Girl Who Had No Fear

You don’t really want to be friends with Dr George McKenzie. Such a friendship is likely to involve danger in general, and eyeballs in particular, and not in terribly nice ways.

On the other hand, George is good to have on your side, as long as you manage to stay alive. In the fourth outing for Marnie Riches’s more than feisty heroine, things are darker than ever, and as you read you can’t help but wonder if anyone at all will be alive at the end. Apart from the bad guy, who appears to have at least nine lives.

Well, I clearly can’t comment on that. You must read and find out for yourself, and I can highly recommend starting the new year with Dr McKenzie. She’s imagining danger everywhere, and can defend herself with an Old German dictionary if need be.

Mothers are everywhere in The Girl Who Had No Fear. There is George’s own, who has disappeared. Elvis is busy juggling police work with looking after his mother, who seems to be on her very last legs. Marie is another mother, as is a fearsome girl George encounters when she goes off on her own to… Detective van den Bergen’s daughter is a new mother, too, and this changes how George’s lover looks on taking risks.

This time the crime hinges on bad drugs, and van den Bergen and George search all over the world for answers as to why so many men end up dead in one of Amsterdam’s canals. And it’s not just about a mother who’s nowhere to be found, but George’s long lost father pops up on the horizon. If it is him. If he’s not dead.

And will Marnie have to start afresh with a whole new set of characters in the next book?

Marnie goes tartan

I had put clean clothes on, but I was no match for Marnie Riches, who made her first ever entry onto Scottish soil (well it was more like Glaswegian tarmac, but still) yesterday wearing tartan jeans and a shaggy black jacket thing, along with – I swear – freshly cerised hair. So she looked stunning, but seemed to be willing to be seen in my company anyway.

Marnie was on her way to an event in the metropolis of Motherwell, and had time for a Witch before it. I had swotted up on Glasgow’s tearooms/coffeeshops and felt that the overflow Willow Tearooms in Buchanan Street might just be it.

Willow Tea Rooms

My be-tartanned companion sat on one of those highbacked Charles Rennie Macintosh chairs, while I sat on the sofa, resting my chin on the table. Easy to tell who was the more elegant one. (If you’re wondering; it wasn’t me.) But the Willow blend tea was good and Marnie’s carrot cupcake was a sort of healthy vegetable choice. I’d been afraid she’d want the prosecco tea, in which case I’d have had to stop her, seeing as it was pre-event.

We talked books, killing people, and builders. That’s talking about builders, not killing them. Marnie is writing crime novels as if there’s no tomorrow, and I am hoping for lots more hair-raising murders from her.

And with jeans like that, she’d be perfect for Bloody Scotland.

Bookwitch bites #137

No, no, no. David Walliams is not ‘the biggest name in children’s books.’ He just isn’t. He’s a famous man, and he writes books many children enjoy, and they sell well. But he is not the biggest, no matter what festivals such as Bath say in their sales emails. I realise they are happy to have him coming, and I’m glad they are happy, but for bigness we need to look elsewhere. Or even in their own festival programme, where surely Michael Morpurgo is a not inconsiderable name.

Michael, since we’ve moved on to him, opened an exhibition at Seven Stories this weekend. I’d have loved to go, but somehow Newcastle appeared to be further away than I had hoped. I’m guessing it’s a similarly informative exhibition about Michael and his work, rather like the Jacqueline Wilson one a few years ago. It should be well worth going to.

Moving on to adult crime, Marnie Riches is yet again in with a chance of winning an award for her George McKenzie books. This time it’s the Tess Gerritsen Award for Best Series, and if you click here you can vote for her. (Or someone else, should you be so minded…) I did, and it was easy. Marnie might want to kiss you for it, or so she says, but if you run fast enough this can – hopefully – be avoided.

There’s no end to awards that can be won, so I’ve got my fingers crossed for Adrian McKinty and his Rain Dogs in the Theakston’s Crime Novel of the Year Award. His publisher has made this page for Adrian, where you can read about when he met Jimmy Savile, as well as Adrian’s future with colouring books. I’m sure it’s going to be bright.