Tag Archives: Rosalind Beardshaw

Hugs all over

Hugs, love, and cuddles to all.

Today’s three picture books are adorable, each in their own way. Hugless Douglas is almost sensible. You can have a star for a pet. Sort of. And I’m sure you can really cuddle a crocodile, especially between shapeshifters.

Diana Hendry’s You Can’t Cuddle a Crocodile, about the boy with a sister who is always something else, be it a monkey or a bear or the uncuddleable crocodile, keeps the reader on his or her toes. But we can all pretend, can’t we? If it is pretend. Those parents do look a bit funny.

Diana Hendry and Ed Eaves, You Can't Cuddle a Crocodile

Whatever the situation is, the animals are nicely drawn by Ed Eaves.

In Corrinne Averiss’s My Pet Star, the tiny protagonist discovers a star one evening. It has fallen and hurt itself, but is picked up, cuddled and nursed back to health. The star is a lovely pet, apart from not being around in the daytime to eat ice creams in the park. The two grow close until the day comes when the little star needs to go where stars go.

Corrinne Averiss and Rosalind Beardshaw, My Pet Star

Sweet illustrations by Rosalind Beardshaw. I could want my own pet star.

Hugless Douglas is attacked by a bird’s nest, when it falls out of its tree, with eggs in and everything. Doing some egg-sitting while mummy bird gets a new nest together, he finds he needs advice and help. But that’s what bunnies are for. You can cuddle eggs warm, and when you do, well…

David Melling, Hugless Douglas and the Baby Birds

David Melling’s Hugless Douglas and the Baby Birds seemed even more adorable than the usual Douglas. But at least he didn’t sit on the eggs!

All three books make you want babies and toddlers to read to.

Lulu Gets a Cat

Anna McQuinn shows how children can prove they will manage something they want very much. In this case it’s Lulu who loves cats (I counted ten toy cats in her room!), and who really, really wants a real cat.

Anna McQuinn and Rosalind Beardshaw, Lulu Gets a Cat

By pretending that one of the toy cats is real, she shows her parents that she understands the work involved in having a live animal to look after, and her mum gives in. (They – nearly – always do, don’t they?)

So after some reading up on facts they visit the cat shelter, where one of the cats ‘chooses’ Lulu. Plenty of shopping for cat things later, it is time to pick up Lulu’s new friend.

This is lovely, and should inspire children that maybe they can influence what happens in life.