Category Archives: Education

Peddle? I don’t think so.

Aaand we’re peddling again. Eighteen months ago (thank goodness for the search facility – and I’ll get to that word any minute now – on Bookwitch) I moaned grumpily about the peddling of bikes in fiction. I do enjoy a good complaint. Towards other people, and not directed at me.

I have now read two novels in quick succession where the main character peddles their bike. Several times. Consistency is good. It means they firmly believe you peddle bikes. Or their editors do.

Bikes obviously are peddled, but mostly in bikeshops or on Gumtree and similar sites.

And don’t get me started on facilities. Usually I rather hope I will be offered a toilet, or more generally a nice arrangement of useful things and services.

I was reading the local paper last week, about a primary school that had closed its doors for the last time. The building was so old and decrepit the school will be demolished.

And a new facility will rise in its place!

So they get rid of a school, and build a facility. It’s hardly surprising a facility won’t be as good as a school in getting the difference between peddling and pedalling across. (Offspring pedalled at their primary school. There was an after school class in safe cycling.)

(Psst, anyone want a bike? Or two? The Resident IT Consultant is about to peddle a couple of bikes, as we can’t even swing a squirrell in our garage at the moment. Which, presumably, is why one of them visited the conservatory a few days ago. Stray cats needing to be sent packing is one thing. But I can’t abide the thought of the squirrels starting in on our food supplies, having witnessed how they dealt with the Christmas canapés last December.)

Bike

50 things you should know about space

I said about Raman Prinja’s last book that it had everything you’d want on astronomy for children. This was true, until I came upon his new book, 50 Things You Should Know About Space, which is wonderful and the kind of book every child should have. I believe this even if they’re not into space (how could anyone not be, though?). Yet.

Raman Prinja, 50 Things You Should Know About Space

The Professor of Astrophysics has managed to fill this new book with what has been my life for years now; the Kepler telescope, Goldilocks, exoplanets, the Atacama desert, and so on.

Beginning with some historical facts before moving on to our own Solar system, Raman looks at how to find new worlds, what to find them with, and how to land on a comet, which is the sort of thing that might come in handy one day.

And there are new, even larger large telescopes on the horizon, that will see more and better than the ones used today.

Apparently some of this is rocket science. So much for people who are always saying things are not. Some things simply have to be.

I was so excited about this book that I was wondering who I could pass it on to once I was done with it. I’d like to inspire a small human to take an interest in this kind of thing.

But then I thought, pass it on?

Cool

I held my breath yesterday morning.

Well, actually, I tidied up after the day before and ran the dishwasher and put the leftovers in the freezer. But it amounts to much the same thing.

Daughter was the first to leave the party on Monday, as she was already 24 hours late getting to her conference. Luckily the plane ran to time, or the Resident IT Consultant would have had to drive through the night to get her to Uppsala for the next morning, when someone had booked her to actually give a talk.

She was a bit surprised by this. I don’t know what I was, because I don’t know about all these stars and spots, that are either hot or cool. And something is eating them (which frankly sounds like the beginning of a horror sci-fi novel). According to her professor it’s a bit like discovering a long lost, or previously unknown, Pink Floyd album. This means little to me, but sort of places him in a certain age bracket.

#CS19 is where you want to go to find out about cool stars. It’s more than my life is worth to post a photo on here.

Another Scottish Friendly

You might have noticed before that the Scottish Friendly Children’s Book Tours tend to offer some really rather good authors and illustrators to schools around Scotland. Their past list reads like a Who’s Who in children’s books. I can’t tell you how excited I was to hear they were bringing Sarah McIntyre here next.

Sarah McIntyre

Sarah is both an illustrator and an author. She arrives this weekend, for five days in the Highlands, which in this case means she starts right up north in Thurso and works her way ‘south’ to Inverness. Well, to me Inverness is still pretty north, and this week is pretty full of other things, and I have reluctantly come to the conclusion that Sarah and her Highlands will have to be witch-free this time. But there are ten lucky schools who get her full attention.

And occasionally (what am I saying? It happenes all the time) Sarah gets attention in other ways too. She’s not the only one, but the other week she wrote a blog post about it, which is too good not to share. The ‘it’ being hopeful wannabes who ask illustrators to do the illustrations for the book they’ve just written. Usually without any idea of how much work that entails, or that an illustrator would like to be paid, or even being able to be polite once they’ve been turned down. (At least they got a reply!)

The trouble is that even to someone like me who understands that work takes time and you can’t work for free, these professional illustrators make it look so effortless. And I must admit that whenever I daydream about having a book out there that is all mine, my next daydream is who to ask to illustrate it, or at least do some nice cover art for me…

Bookwitch by Sarah McIntyre

Oops. Very easily done.

I am the proud owner of a genuine McIntyre. Digital, but very lovely. I believe it was something Sarah ‘threw together’ on her sickbed, one day when she was too tired to do anything else. She’s made the wicked old witch look quite pretty.

Ankh water

Ankh water

I overlooked this bottle the other week, as I carefully photographed everything that was in my Terry Pratchett partybag.

I was extremely thirsty that evening, but this bottle of Ankh water was safe from me. I’m not sure I can ever drink it. One, it’s a precious memento. Two, is it safe to drink Ankh water?

Surely it’s a fairly questionable substance? So on balance I reckon it will be better for it to grace some surface or other at Bookwitch Towers, and I can smile at it as I swoosh past. It’s got a reasonable date, after all.

And to return to harping on about libraries, I know I forgot to mention the Beaconsfield library two weeks ago. They have decided they want a plaque outside in Terry’s memory. After all, it’s the place he reckoned he learned the most in, having little respect for his secondary school.

Aren’t we glad Terry had his library to go to? Would we have had any of his books if he’d been stuck with school learning only? (Well, maybe. Apparently some of his teachers became Discworld characters. But still. Libraries rock. Apart from the Stockport librarian who felt Terry was unsuitable for children.)

Stirling goings-on

The Bookbug Week‘s flagship event will this year take place only a mile or so away from Bookwitch Towers. Scottish Book Trust’s annual book week for young readers runs from May 16th for a week, kicking off at Bannockburn with a day of, I think, poetry and stuff.

Bookbug

The rest of the programme happens all over Scotland, and the theme this year is international. Songs and rhymes from around the world.

This tallies with what you find in the programme for Stirling’s own Off the Page where, surprisingly, they offer both a German Bookbug session, as well as a bilingual event or two.

You can also do colouring in and design your own coat of arms, along with attending a teddy bear’s picnic. At the other end of the age scale (or so I imagine) is a vintage reminiscence tea party, which sounds really very nice. Except I hope I am not old enough for that sort of thing yet.

Somewhere there are dragons.

In schools (they have all the luck!) you might find Chae Strathie, Janis Mackay, Kirkland Ciccone, Alex Nye, Ross MacKenzie and Mairi Hedderwick.

But despair not, Mairi Hedderwick is also doing a public event. Maybe even two. This ten-day long festival starts on May 6th, and other public children’s events offer Lari Don and Nick Sharratt.

Helen MacKinven, whom I met at Yay!YA+ last week is also doing an event. As are several of the big names in Scottish crime, such as Lin Anderson, Helen Fitzgerald, Denise Mina and Caro Ramsay.

There are many more events and many more authors. And much upset on my part because I will not be going to any of these… The more attractive the event, the less convenient the date (for me).

The ability to read

Toby in Tony Bradman’s The Boy and the Globe was able to read. He was young, and an orphan, and so desperate he took up a [short] life of crime in order to eat. But he could read.

He got enjoyment from a book one of the other thieves accidentally stole, and Toby helped this boy, purely by being able to read. And when they ended up thieving at the Globe, it was the reading that eventually got him his better job, as an actor, as a friend of Shakespeare’s, and more.

Ned in Mary Hoffman’s Shakespeare’s Ghost could also read, as could the young girl who wanted to marry him. Both were poor, and Ned was an orphan like Toby. He couldn’t have done his acting without being literate. Or maybe he could, but it would have been much harder.

Set in a period when I suspect most normal children, by which I mean not terribly well off, would never learn how to read, this is remarkable. But had they not been able to, the plots for the books they feature in wouldn’t have worked.

It’s probably not just a plot device though. I’d like to think of it as being there to demonstrate to children how well someone can do just because they have this basic skill. A skill that many still don’t have, or not to the degree we’d like them to.

And for all the Government’s harping on about ‘Literacy,’ they are not necessarily helping. Especially not when they remove the places where the children could go to practice and enjoy their reading skills. You know, like libraries.

Toby and Ned got to where they wanted through reading. I assume that’s what the people in power are afraid of.